5 Job Search Tips for Optical Sales Professionals

by Kelli Moss on January 15, 2014

Whether you’re just starting out, or consider yourself a seasoned veteran of the game, Sales is a profession that transcends nearly every industry imaginable.  In the Optical market - as in other markets - a company’s sales can directly impact top line performance, thus the quality of Sales professionals is critical to those employers who rely on them.  When it comes to finding a job in the Optical Sales market, there are a variety of things you can do to not only make yourself stand out amongst other qualified Sales Professionals, but also ensure that you land an awesome job with an outstanding employer.  Here are 5 tips you can keep in your back pocket when looking for a job in Optical Sales.

In the optician store

1. Use Your Professional Network

If you’re in Optical Sales, odds are you’ve made some pretty valuable connections thus far in your career. If you’re just starting out, however, it may be time to start building your professional network so you have something to work with (You can learn how to get started from one of our earlier blog posts). Using your professional network to find a sales job is a great way to make sure that someone you know knows someone who may be able to get you hired.  If you’re currently employed, this could be a dangerous move - especially if your recent search for a new job falls on the wrong ears.  The key is to make sure you strategically plan out who you communicate your job search with so as to ensure you don’t wind up jobless before you find your next gig.

Using social networks such as LinkedIn or Facebook to reach out to potential employers is another excellent way to expand beyond your physical network of professionals in your job search. By simply reaching out to colleagues at other organizations online, you could be introduced to a person of power in a place you’ve only dreamt of working at.  Taking advantage of your online network while continuing to nurture and reach out to your physical network could work wonders in your search for the perfect Sales job.

2. State Your Value Proposition

I doesn’t matter if you’re selling the latest style of frames, the best contact lenses, or a shiny new display unit for an optical dispensary, every Salesperson knows the customer should be given some sort of value proposition if they’re ever going to buy.  Similar to what you would use for selling a product, a good Salesperson should be able to convey a value proposition of sorts about themselves to their would-be employer during the job search process.  Having the ability to show an employer what you could bring to the table (and their revenue stream) in the midst of an interview could mean the difference between landing your dream job and going back to square one in the search process. Not to say that having a personal value proposition will guarantee you the job, but having one certainly makes pitching your ability to get the job done a whole lot easier in the process.

3. Clearly Define Your Objectives

When you’re trying to close a major deal, how often do you take the time to explain the particulars of that deal to the buyer? Even if your answer is “rarely”, it’s still important to some degree that both parties are on the same page. Perhaps not surprisingly, the same can apply to your job search. Outlining your career goals and objectives during the job search process is a valuable message to communicate to potential employers.  By defining what you hope to get out of the position, whether on your Résumé or in the actual interview, you’re showing your future boss that you have the ability to plan, prepare, and take action when necessary to hit your goals in life and on the job.

4. Exude Confidence

Just like a fresh pair of frames can boost the confidence level of any satisfied customer (my attempt at a sales pitch), a candidate that is confident can leave a lasting impression on a potential employer in the job search process.  If you weren’t confident about the ability of the product you were selling to meet the needs of the buyer, then wouldn’t that make the customer less likely to buy?  Feel free to disagree, but it seems as though a little confidence certainly couldn’t be that bad - especially when you’re trying to sell your talents and expertise to a potential employer.  Overall, confidence is a trait that is absolutely critical in the Sales profession, so failing to demonstrate confidence in a job interview or email correspondence can hurt your chances at landing a job in Optical Sales.

5. Follow Up

We’ve said this time and again, but for some reason we can’t stress this enough. Following up with an employer after an interview or networking event is imperative to finding success in a Sales role. It’s like sending a thank-you gift to your largest account for a recent order - it just makes sense.  As every Sales Professional should know, a simple email, thank-you card, or phone call can make all the difference - even in the job search process.

Overall, finding a Sales job in the Optical market is a lot like selling in the Optical market.  You should do is start by reaching out to those who know you, move on to convey an irresistible value proposition, swoop in and clearly define how you can meet their needs, and follow through with a killer follow-up (and maybe a little free sample - just kidding!).  Sounds easy, right? Well, that’s still up for debate - but one thing we do know is that when it comes to finding a job, every detail - if properly acknowledged - can make all the difference when you’re competing for a job in the Sales profession.

Are you looking for a Sales job in the eye care industry? Local Eye Site has jobs for you, too! Check out our most recent listings today.

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Genaro 06.26.13 at 9:25 AM

It’s tough job working in the sales department but that can be said for just about anything else in life…

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